Obesity Makes People Feel…

Depression

Obesity is highly associated with depression. And weight loss surgery returns your risk of depression back down to the rest of the population.

Being obese or overweight increases your chances of being depressed. It is also easy to see that being depressed (for most people) makes it harder to lose weight. Which is a more than just a bit hard to wriggle your way out of if you tend to eat more when you are feeling low. This creates a horrible situation where losing weight is vital for your mental health and yet less likely because of your mental health. This makes it more reasonalbe to seek help with your weight. Being obese, trying to lose weight, losing weight and weight loss surgery are all emotionally charged processes. So we need to be very respectful and caring towards you and mindful of the important role of your emotions when helping you through the weight loss surgery process.

Being obese, trying to lose weight, losing weight and weight loss surgery are all emotionally charged.

 

What fits your busy schedule better, exercising one hour a day or being dead 24 hours a day?

Emotional eating is where we eat because we feel something that in our minds is a trigger to eat. As opposed to when hunger triggers eating. We all do this to a greater or lesser extent. It is helpful for us to know how much this type of eating contributes to your eating and weight problem when choosing the right operation for you.

Many people tell their surgeon about their struggle with their weight over the years. It can be a very confronting and emotional process and tears are common. Of course, they are common.

Obesity effects every part of who you are and talking to someone who might be able to help you to help yourself is a big deal. So, not to worry if you have a tear or two at your consultation, seen it plenty of times…

 

Low Self Esteem

This all adds to problems with self-esteem. So many people get all confused about their weight and self-esteem, which is the chicken, which is the egg?

Frankly, it doesn’t make much difference which comes first, but it is very clear that obese people find it hard to say they love themselves, are proud of themselves, can look at themselves in the mirror and enjoy what they see. Instead, many of our patients tell us they feel invisible, can’t look at themselves in the mirror, won’t be in a photo etc. And their first thought in the morning is about their weight and their last thought at night and many thoughts in between. And all these thoughts are about how bad they are in some way, somehow inadequate, don’t have enough will power, how they should just get on with life, and just lose weight, and stop being lazy…All these negative thoughts are eating away at their self esteem leaving them feel…I don’t need to tell you how they feel, you know already, its obvious, they feel lousy. But they do want to feel good about themselves again.

All these negative thoughts are eating away at their self esteem leaving them feel…lousy.

 

Social Isolation

People with a weight problem are more likely to feel alone and describe themselves as lonely. Feel they might not ever meet the ‘right person’, feel uncomfortable with intimacy, feel they are being judged for their weight, and just want to hide sometimes.

Some people think that the jolly fat friend is going to go away and be replaced by a slim boring person. This is not much to look forward to. But the opposite happens. The person loses weight, feels more confident within themselves, feel less of a need to bung on a big personality to match the big frame, and just relax more within themselves. This can mean some people will seem less jolly, but most people will be overall much happier and psychologically healthier people to be a friend with.

Some people think that the jolly fat friend is going to go away and be replaced by a slim boring person.


Some people experience major changes in their self worth and self esteem. There is a jump in libido, and zest for life. This and numerous other changes that occur sound all positive. But these changes can make this a challenging time. Anyone involved in a relationship with someone who has had a major change of any kind will notice this. Most of these changes are great. But some make things difficult for a while.

Please Contact Melbourne Bariatrics on  03  9770  7189  for more information or to make an appointment
Royal Australasian College of SurgeonsAMA - Australian Medical AssociationFRACS - Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeonsmattu - Minimal Access Therapy Training Unit GuildfordIFSO - International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic DisordersMonash University
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